Volume 22, Issue 15 p. 2204-2209
Research Article

Impact of psychogenic movement disorders versus Parkinson's on disability, quality of life, and psychopathology

Karen E. Anderson MD

Corresponding Author

Karen E. Anderson MD

Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Room N4W46, Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201Search for more papers by this author
Ann L. Gruber-Baldini PhD

Ann L. Gruber-Baldini PhD

Division of Gerontology, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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Christopher G. Vaughan PhD

Christopher G. Vaughan PhD

Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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Stephen G. Reich MD

Stephen G. Reich MD

Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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Paul S. Fishman MD, PhD

Paul S. Fishman MD, PhD

Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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William J. Weiner MD

William J. Weiner MD

Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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Lisa M. Shulman MD

Lisa M. Shulman MD

Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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First published: 17 September 2007
Citations: 104

Abstract

Patients with psychogenic movement disorders (PMD) often report severe impairment, yet the impact of PMD on disability and quality of life has not been examined. We compared 66 patients with PMD and 704 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) on measures of disability (Older Americans Resources and Services Scale, OARS); quality of life (QOL; SF-12v2 Health Survey) and psychiatric symptomatology (Brief Symptom Inventory 18, BSI-18). On the total OARS, PMD and PD patients reported similar levels of disability (17.6 ± 6.6, 19.8 ± 10.9, P = 0.490 at “best” function and 24.1 ± 11.2, 26.2 ± 14.3, P = 0.497 at their “worst” function). PMD patients reported similar Physical Health QOL to PD patients (38.9 ± 14.5, 39.8 ± 11.6, P = 0.652) but worse mental health QOL (41.6 ± 13.4 vs. 48.9 ± 11.0, P < 0.001). On the BSI-18, PMD patients reported higher levels of distress on the Global Symptom Index (62.03 ± 9.6 vs. 53.7 ± 9.9, P < 0.001) and on Anxiety, Depression and Somatization subscales (PMD vs. PD scores: Anxiety 58.9 ± 12.0 vs. 52.3 ± 10.1, P < 0.001; Depression 58.8 ± 11.9 vs. 51.3 ± 10.3, P < 0.001; Somatization 60.5 ± 11.0 vs. 54.7 ± 8.7, P < 0.001). Thus, severity of disability reported by the PMD group was equal to that seen in a progressive neurodegenerative condition. Quality of life and mental health implications of PMD were also evident. PMD impacts several aspects of patient function and daily life. © 2007 Movement Disorder Society