Volume 26, Issue 3 p. 367-371
Viewpoint

Bicycling breaks the ice for freezers of gait

Anke H. Snijders MD,

Anke H. Snijders MD,

Department of Neurology and Parkinson Centre Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands

Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands

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Ivan Toni PhD,

Ivan Toni PhD,

Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Donders Centre for Cognition, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands

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Evžen Ružička MD, DSc

Evžen Ružička MD, DSc

Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

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Bastiaan R. Bloem MD, PhD

Corresponding Author

Bastiaan R. Bloem MD, PhD

Department of Neurology and Parkinson Centre Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands

Parkinson Centre Nijmegen, Department of Neurology (935), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The NetherlandsSearch for more papers by this author
First published: 01 February 2011
Citations: 47

Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report. Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

Patients with freezing of gait (FOG) have episodic problems with generating adequate steps. This phenomenon is both common and debilitating in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) or atypical parkinsonism. We recently presented a video case of a patient with longstanding PD and severe FOG, who showed a remarkably preserved ability to ride a bicycle. Here, we comment on the scientific and clinical implications of this single case observation, and show the video of a similar case. We first consider several pathophysiological explanations for this striking discrepancy between walking and cycling in PD. We then discuss the merits and shortcomings of cycling as a potential new avenue for rehabilitation and exercise training in patients grounded by FOG. Finally, we provide some directions for future research stimulated by this fascinating observation. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society