Volume 30, Issue 3 p. 328-338
Scientific Perspectives

The subthalamic nucleus, oscillations, and conflict

Baltazar Zavala BA

Corresponding Author

Baltazar Zavala BA

Experimental Neurology Group, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK

Surgical Neurology Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Correspondence to: Dr. Baltazar Zavala, BG 10 RM 3D20 MSC 1414, 10 Center Dr., Bethesda, MD 20892-1414, E-mail: [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
Kareem Zaghloul MD, PhD

Kareem Zaghloul MD, PhD

Surgical Neurology Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

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Peter Brown MD

Peter Brown MD

Experimental Neurology Group, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK

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First published: 17 February 2015
Citations: 75

Funding agencies: Dr. Brown is funded by the Medical Research Council and the National Institute for Health Research Oxford Biomedical Research Centre. Drs. Zavala and Zaghloul are funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke. Dr. Zavala is additionally supported by the National Institutes of Health Oxford-Cambridge fellowship.

Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report.

Author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Abstract

The subthalamic nucleus (STN), which is currently the most common target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD), has received increased attention over the past few years for the roles it may play in functions beyond simple motor control. In this article, we highlight several of the theoretical, interventional, and electrophysiological studies that have implicated the STN in response inhibition. Most influential among this evidence has been the reported effect of STN DBS in increasing impulsive responses in the laboratory setting. Yet, how this relates to pathological impulsivity in patients' everyday lives remains uncertain. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society